COMMUNITY BRIEFS | MMH Hosts Parkinson’s Support Group Oct. 29
by Watch Staff
Oct 25, 2012 | 2164 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
COMMUNITY BUILDERS – Wells Fargo bank employees turned Habitat for Humanity volunteers help work to remodel a home at 1707 Canyon Court in Montrose Saturday. Habitat For Humanity construction supervisor Bill Bond said the remodel will take about three weeks to complete, and that volunteers are always needed and welcome. To volunteer, call the Habitat for Humanity Re-Store at 970/252-9303 ext. 1. (Photo by William Woody)
COMMUNITY BUILDERS – Wells Fargo bank employees turned Habitat for Humanity volunteers help work to remodel a home at 1707 Canyon Court in Montrose Saturday. Habitat For Humanity construction supervisor Bill Bond said the remodel will take about three weeks to complete, and that volunteers are always needed and welcome. To volunteer, call the Habitat for Humanity Re-Store at 970/252-9303 ext. 1. (Photo by William Woody)
slideshow
SPIRIT AWARD WINNERS – Wearing gold crowns and medals they’d just received, Maria Trujillo (left), Cannon Phillips (center) and Stephany Sumrall (right) were surrounded by fellow Hampton Inn Montrose team members Monday afternoon after it was announced that the three had won the Spirit of Hampton Award. The three of them helped a guest, who had locked his keys in his rental car, get to the airport on time and then worked with a locksmith to open the car and finally return the car. It was that level of service that earned them the award. While there were award winners crowned in Kansas and in Florida earlier that day, only the Montrose Hampton Inn had three Spirit of Hampton Award winners. (Photo by Gus Jarvis)
SPIRIT AWARD WINNERS – Wearing gold crowns and medals they’d just received, Maria Trujillo (left), Cannon Phillips (center) and Stephany Sumrall (right) were surrounded by fellow Hampton Inn Montrose team members Monday afternoon after it was announced that the three had won the Spirit of Hampton Award. The three of them helped a guest, who had locked his keys in his rental car, get to the airport on time and then worked with a locksmith to open the car and finally return the car. It was that level of service that earned them the award. While there were award winners crowned in Kansas and in Florida earlier that day, only the Montrose Hampton Inn had three Spirit of Hampton Award winners. (Photo by Gus Jarvis)
slideshow
FIRST FROST - With small amounts of snow already dusting Beattie Peak, Vermillion Peak and Golden Horn, a fall snowstorm blew over Trout Lake earlier this month. (Photo courtesy of Carl Marcus, Carlmarcusphotography.com)
FIRST FROST - With small amounts of snow already dusting Beattie Peak, Vermillion Peak and Golden Horn, a fall snowstorm blew over Trout Lake earlier this month. (Photo courtesy of Carl Marcus, Carlmarcusphotography.com)
slideshow
KUDOS FOR ALL POINTS TRANSIT– Region 8 FTA Linda Gehrke (far leaft) presented staff and facilitators (left to right) Cathy Monroe, Mokhtee Ahmad, Henrika Buchannan-Smith, Terri Wilcox, Jamie Pfister and Lorna Wilson with the 2012 Federal Transit Administration “Administrator’s Award for Outstanding Public Service” on Oct. 16, at the 20th National Conference on Rural Public and Intercity Bus Transportation in Salt Lake City. (Courtesy photo)
KUDOS FOR ALL POINTS TRANSIT– Region 8 FTA Linda Gehrke (far leaft) presented staff and facilitators (left to right) Cathy Monroe, Mokhtee Ahmad, Henrika Buchannan-Smith, Terri Wilcox, Jamie Pfister and Lorna Wilson with the 2012 Federal Transit Administration “Administrator’s Award for Outstanding Public Service” on Oct. 16, at the 20th National Conference on Rural Public and Intercity Bus Transportation in Salt Lake City. (Courtesy photo)
slideshow
FALL FUN – Lia Todd, a fourth grader at Ouray Elementary School, bobbed for apples at the Second Chance Humane Society’s Howl-a-ween Party last Saturday afternoon at Angel Ridge Ranch, as a young friend watched on. (Photo by Samantha Wright)
FALL FUN – Lia Todd, a fourth grader at Ouray Elementary School, bobbed for apples at the Second Chance Humane Society’s Howl-a-ween Party last Saturday afternoon at Angel Ridge Ranch, as a young friend watched on. (Photo by Samantha Wright)
slideshow
PUMPKIN SEARCH – Macy McRoberts and Mason Scanlon picked out perfect pumpkins at the Telluride Elementary School last week in preparation for the upcoming holiday full of trick-or-treating and candy. (Photo by Brett Schreckengost)
PUMPKIN SEARCH – Macy McRoberts and Mason Scanlon picked out perfect pumpkins at the Telluride Elementary School last week in preparation for the upcoming holiday full of trick-or-treating and candy. (Photo by Brett Schreckengost)
slideshow
Totally Talented – Conor Keenan sang “See I’m Smiling” from the musical The Last Five Years during the Telluride School Open Stage Talent show held on Tuesday, Oct. 23, at the Palm Theater. Keenan took second place in the talent show with his performance. (Photo by Dale Kondracki)
Totally Talented – Conor Keenan sang “See I’m Smiling” from the musical The Last Five Years during the Telluride School Open Stage Talent show held on Tuesday, Oct. 23, at the Palm Theater. Keenan took second place in the talent show with his performance. (Photo by Dale Kondracki)
slideshow
NAUGHTY GIRLS – Amy Winterrowd (Columbia) and Kim Kelly (Magenta) vamped it up at last weekend’s production of the Rocky Horror Picture Show at the Wright Opera House in Ouray. In the true Rocky tradition, a “shadow cast” of local miscreants pantomimed the action onstage as it unfolded onscreen, and those who had never before seen the show had their faces marked with a lipstick “V” (for virgin). The cast was headlined by Dale Meader who embraced the role of Dr. Frank-N-Furter with vampish aplomb. The cult-classic musical was first unleashed in 1975. This is the fourth consecutive year that it has been put on at the Wright. (Photo by Samantha Wright)
NAUGHTY GIRLS – Amy Winterrowd (Columbia) and Kim Kelly (Magenta) vamped it up at last weekend’s production of the Rocky Horror Picture Show at the Wright Opera House in Ouray. In the true Rocky tradition, a “shadow cast” of local miscreants pantomimed the action onstage as it unfolded onscreen, and those who had never before seen the show had their faces marked with a lipstick “V” (for virgin). The cast was headlined by Dale Meader who embraced the role of Dr. Frank-N-Furter with vampish aplomb. The cult-classic musical was first unleashed in 1975. This is the fourth consecutive year that it has been put on at the Wright. (Photo by Samantha Wright)
slideshow
MONTROSE – The Acute Rehabilitation Unit at Montrose Memorial Hospital hosts the Parkinson’s Support Group Meeting on Monday, Oct. 29 at 2 p.m.  The group will meet downstairs in Conference Room B at MMH.

Executive director at The Parkinson’s Association of the Rockies, Cheryl Siefert, MNM,  will discuss “Cognitive Challenges.”

The Parkinson’s Support Group mission is to educate, provide resources, and support caregivers and their families.

For more information or transportation arrangements, call Cora at 252-2996.

BUSINESS INCUBATOR CENTER AND CSU-EXTENSION HOST COTTAGE FOOD BUSINESS CLASS NOV. 1

GRAND JUNCTION – The Business Incubator Center along with Colorado State University Extension will host a free half-day cottage food business start-up class Thursday, Nov. 1, 9-11:30 a.m., at the Business Incubator Center, 2591 B ¾ Road in Grand Junction.

The 2-1/2 hour class will cover everything you need to know to start a cottage food business, including acceptable products, packaging, labeling, insurance, and the business planning process.

Pre-registration is required. For more information or to register, please contact the Business Incubator Center in Grand Junction at 243-5242.

NOT YOUR MAMA'S ZUMBA: CREATIVE DANCE FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY ON NOV. 1

TELLURIDE –  Come to a family dance party on Thursday, Nov. 1, 5:30-6:30 p.m., at Wilkinson Public Library in the children’s room. Sponsored by Mountain Sprouts Preschool, Parents as Teachers and the library, the program is free and open to all kids under 8 and their parents. No drop-offs, please.

Led by Megan Heller, the program is designed as a way for parents and their young children to have fun and exercise together: dancing, wiggling, laughing and making up new moves. Heller, just back from a creative dance training, is full of new ideas for how to play with movement.  

As part of the ongoing “Growing Together” lecture series for parents of preschoolers sponsored by Mountain Sprouts Preschool, the program offers resources for parents of regional preschoolers. In this session, Heller will be giving parents tips on how to have fun dancing with their children in their own homes, beginning with an interactive storytime, and then moving the group into movement and play. “We’ll combine literacy and creative movement and have fun as parents and kids,” she says. There will also be a brief discussion after for parents offering ideas for incorporating movement into daily family life.

The Growing Together Series, offered four times a year,is “a way for all parents of preschoolers in the Telluride region to get together and share their concerns and creative solutions for how to nurture our children and support each other the best we can,” says Rosemerry Wahtola Trommer, director of the series.

Mountain Sprouts, a Waldorf-based preschool, is currently accepting applications for new students. For more information, contact Erin at 970/728-8004.  

For more information about Not Your Mama’s Zumba: Creative Dance for the Whole Family, contact Trommer at 970/728-0399.

HOLIDAY ARTS BAZAAR APPLICATIONS DUE FRIDAY, NOV. 2

TELLURIDE – Registration is open for the Telluride Arts Holiday Bazaar, now through Nov. 2, to all artists working in the Telluride region.  The Holiday Bazaar takes place December 7-9. For more information, please visit www.TellurideArts.org or email info@telluridearts.org, or call 970.728.3930. Telluride Arts, established in 1983, is today a holiday tradition featuring the work of over 40 regional artists, showcasing locally made arts, fine crafts and artisan foods made in the Telluride region.

FIRST ANNUAL CHARITY DODGEBALL TOURNAMENT ON SATURDAY, NOV. 10

MONTROSE – Two of the area’s vital nonprofits serving children – Court Appointed Special Advocates, or CASA-Voices for Children, and the Black Canyon Boys and Girls Club  – come together to host the First Annual Charity Dodgeball Tournament benefitting local kids and honoring area veterans.

The Tournament, held at the Olathe High School Gym on Saturday, Nov. 10, kicks off at 8 a.m., with team registration and a rule review meeting. Dodgeball starts at 10 a.m. The day will culminate with crowning the victor and celebrating the nation’s veterans.

Karen Tuttle, executive director of CASA-Voices for Children, said “I am honored to partner with the Black Canyon Boys and Girls Club to bring a new joint fundraising event to our area where law enforcement, firefighters, EMS, and other agencies are given a good reason – and a good cause – for throwing balls at one another!”

Justin Kiehl, executive director of the BCBGC, said, “I am excited to be working with CASA-Voices for Children to bring a fun and new event to Montrose! No more driving, putting, and chipping at a fundraiser: it’s time to ‘Dodge, Duck, Dip, Dive, Dodge!’”

All teams are welcome, and law enforcement agency teams are encouraged to participate.

Participants must be 18 years or older. The tournament is double elimination, which guarantees each team a minimum of two matches. There will be trophies and awards to first- and second-place teams. The team registration fee is $300, per team of six with one alternate. Team T-shirts are required.

Spectator fees are $10 for ages 13 and older, $5 for kids 6-12, and kids 5 and under are free. Veterans are also free in honor of Veterans’ Day and all veterans’ service and sacrifice.

CASA-Voices for Children provides a voice in court for every abused and neglected child in the 7th Judicial District on the Western Slope of Colorado.

The Black Canyon Boys and Girls Club provides a fun, safe, positive environment to enable every young person to develop into caring, healthy, responsible citizens with attainable goals for a great future.

For more information on the Charity Dodgeball Tournament, call CASA-Voices for Children, 970/249-0337, or the Black Canyon Boys and Girls Club, 970-249-5168, or email Stacey at sryan@casanow.org.

MEDICARE COUNSELING AND OPEN ENROLLMENT THROUGH DEC. 7

WESTERN SLOPE – Medicare Counseling available through RSVP to help local seniors during Open Enrollment, and RSVP-CO. West, Inc., serves the following counties; Delta, Gunnison, Montrose, Ouray, and San Miguel.

If you’re near or over age 65, Medicare benefits are an important part of your life.  Part A, B, C, and D are all included in your overall Medicare coverage, and that’s the good news. The challenge is that these “parts” have many options, and knowing it all, and what will work best for you, could be very confusing. That’s where RSVP Colorado West, Inc. has trained counselors ready to step in to help.  RSVP is offering SHIP (Senior Help Insurance Assistance program) Medicare counseling for seniors, at no charge.

RSVP has several trained Medicare counselors through the SHIP program, including Mabel Risch and Judy Dietrich in Delta/Montrose, as they offered information on changes this year in Medicare. There are no more public meetings for 2012, but these ladies are offering one-on-one counseling sessions in Montrose and Delta, during the Open Enrollment Period for Medicare, which runs through Dec. 7.

“It’s time to compare plans, and make sure you have the right health and prescription drug coverage for you,” Risch, said. “Stay with your current plan if you’re happy with it. Or look for a new one with better coverage, higher quality, and lower cost.”

Ms. Dietrich remembers that many people came in last year “overwhelmed and confused” with all the Medicare information and options. “Our goal is to help them understand, and give them as much information as possible before they make a decision. We also help them relax! We’ve heard from many people we’ve met that it has been reassuring to know someone is on their side!”

For those who currently have plans, counselors are trained on the new changes and updates in Medicare this year. To make an appointment, contact RSVP at 249-9639 or call from anywhere, toll-free, 888/696-7213.

Colorado West RSVP’s counselors helped 760 people navigate the sometimes turbulent Medicare waters during last year’s enrollment period. Their goal is for 800 “helps” this year.

The Colorado SHIP program, overseeing RSVP, is funded by grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

ALL POINTS TRANSIT RECEIVES NATIONAL AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING PUBLIC SERVICE 

MONTROSE –  All Points Transit is one of three rural transit organizations chosen to receive the 2012 Federal Transit Administration “Administrator’s Award for Outstanding Public Service.”  

The award was presented on Oct. 16 at the 20th National Conference on Rural Public and Intercity Bus Transportation in Salt Lake City, Utah, by Region 8 FTA Administrator Linda Gehrke. “We are proud of the transit services we are able to make available for our passengers as well as disabled and returning veterans and their families.  We are honored to receive this prestigious FTA award,” said Lacy Anderson, APT president of the board.  

APT is a 501c3 charitable organization directed by an 11-member volunteer board of directors, whose mission is to provide safe and reliable transportation by promoting access and independence for seniors, persons with disabilities and the general public in Montrose County and surrounding areas.  In continuous operation for more than 32 years, serving the needs of seniors 60-plus and people with disabilities, APT provides driver-assisted door-to-door scheduled transportation for those who need it most.  They recently expanded their transit service to include a flex route in Montrose and Olathe with more than 80 convenient flex stops for the general public.

“All Points Transit Board of Directors and drivers and staff have worked diligently to offer mobility and access for those who need it most and we will continue to look for new and innovative ways to improve service,” said Terri Wilcox, APT executive director.

For more information, contact Wilcox at twilcox@allpointstransit.org or 970/249-8865.

FIELD OF DREAMS FOR JOHNSON ELEMENTARY

MONTROSE – The Johnson Elementary School’s Parent Action Committee, led by Amy Bush, coordinated with the Montrose County School District as parents, faculty, staff, students and local businesses to build the school’s first new soccer field.

“The grass will be planted in the spring as soon as the water is turned back on, and if anyone is interested in helping complete the project or would like to make a donation please contact the school at 249-2584,” says Bush.

This project would never have left the ground without support from Ron Eden, Marty DelTondo, and Randy Friend. So many hard-working volunteers were instrumental in making this happen.  A special thank you goes to Home Depot, Grand Junction Pipe, Design Scapes, Jerry Skees, Dominoes, Bubbles Photography, Subwiches, and the Bush, Griffith, Nichols, Waldow, Belisle, Aufderheide, Helken and Imus families. “We’re very proud of our PAC and we are grateful for the support our community has given. Our students are so ready for this field to be used,” said Johnson Principal Lisa Pierce.

SOURCEGAS FILES ANNUAL GAS COST ADJUSTMENT

GOLDEN – SourceGas Distribution LLC has filed its annual Gas Cost Adjustment with the Colorado Public Utilities Commission for its Western Slope service area. The filing reflects a decrease of 5.16 percent in a customer’s total annual bill for the upcoming period which begins Nov. 1, 2012, and continues through Oct. 31, 2013. In accordance with state law, the company recovers the cost it pays to purchase natural gas on behalf of its customers on a dollar-for-dollar basis, without realizing any profit or loss. The GCA mechanism ensures that customers pay exactly the same amount the company paid to purchase natural gas for them. The new rates, if approved, will take effect Nov. 1, and will be reflected in the next billing cycle.

“Natural gas prices have remained relatively stable, which is one of the reasons natural gas is the fuel of choice for our customers” said Bill Cantrell, president and CEO of SourceGas. “It also continues to be the best energy value for our customers compared to propane or electricity with the added benefits of being clean, abundant and domestically produced.”

For residential customers in the Western Slope service area, the total of the new volumetric rates will be $0.8830 per therm. Based on an average monthly usage of 97 therms, the typical household will now pay an average of about $98.09 per month instead of about $103.43 per month for their natural gas service. Residential customers who typically use 198 therms in January (when bills are usually the highest) will pay approximately $187.27, a decrease of about $10.89, or approximately 5.50 percent, for their bill in January 2013, compared to January 2012. Small business customers who typically use 261 therms in January will pay approximately $242.89, a decrease of about $14.36, or approximately 5.58 percent for their January 2013 bill compared to the same period in 2012.

SourceGas also offers energy efficiency programs designed to assist natural gas customers in Colorado.For more information, visit www.excessisout.com or 1-800-563-0012.

WILDLIFE MIGRATION HAS BEGUN

COLORADO – Colorado wildlife are on the move, migrating to wintering habitats, which is why this season – particularly October and November – tends to have the highest incidents of wildlife-vehicle collisions, or WVCs.

WVCs happen year round, 24/7, but there is an increase during migration season, and particularly during the hours between dusk and dawn. These collisions are not only a matter of safety, but can be quite costly as well.

According to Carole Walker, executive director of the Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association, the insurance industry pays out nearly $1.1 billion a year in claims for all wildlife-vehicle collisions nationwide – and the cost to pay those claims is rising.  The average property damage cost of collisions involving wildlife during the final half of 2010 and the first half of 2011 was $3,171, up 2.2 percent from the year before.

“When we plan or implement any kind of wildlife mitigation for our roadways, we always look at data over a 5 to 10-year period,” said CDOT Region 5 Traffic & Safety Engineer Mike McVaugh. “Only then can we make good decisions.”

This year, motorists will continue to see roadside reminders to slow down in specifically designated corridors. Legislation passed in 2010 called for lowered nighttime speeds and doubled fines for speeding at night in designated “wildlife crossing zones.” (There are no fines for hitting an animal.)

Per the HB 1238, the Colorado Department of Transportation has identified 100 miles of wildlife crossing zones where nighttime speed enforcement was feasible. CDOT has set signs within the zones, where nighttime speeds are reduced to 55 mph only where current speeds are posted at 60 or 65 mph, and only during migration season, now set for October through May. Other sections of highway are signed “WILDLIFE CORRIDOR” The data over the study period, which has included two full migration seasons between April 2010 and May 2012, show a slight decrease in Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions (WVC) overall within the “Wildlife Zones” in the two-year period the signs were posted, as compared with the two-year period before signs were posted. Specifically, a 9 percent decrease in WVCs is noted overall. However, there are many variations among these data when looking at each individual Wildlife Zone.

Per the signs, speed enforcement is set from 5 p.m.-7 a.m., the dark hours in the winter, but not necessarily in the fall and spring.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet