New Regs for Medical Marijuana Dispensaries
by Watch Staff
Aug 20, 2011 | 3386 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Telluride Green Room employee Josh Williams checked the newly required security system and digital camera recording system at their Telluride retail location. (Photo by Brett Schreckengost)
Telluride Green Room employee Josh Williams checked the newly required security system and digital camera recording system at their Telluride retail location. (Photo by Brett Schreckengost)
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TELLURIDE – Paranoiacs beware: Big Brother is watching you. Once you step into a Colorado medical marijuana shop, that is, where new state-mandated top-of-the-line video surveillance and security systems monitor the goings-on every bit almost as thoroughly as a casino surveillance room, lacking only the face-recognition software.

“A lot of people in the industry now feel we're being regulated out of business,” said Telluride Green Room Medical Marijuana Center's Greg Viditz-Ward, who just dropped an estimated $5,000 to update his Town of Telluride-required video equipment bought just last year that, now obsolete, despite its $1,800 price tag, is now obsolete, according to state law, and headed for eBay or Craigslist.

At TGR, the new video cameras trained in on four sites in the center's tiny San Juan Ave. offices – the outside entrance, and the sales, product and video-control rooms – must clearly reveal “patients' faces, the scale and the clipboard,” said staffer Josh Williams, on which transactions are recorded.

“We are going through exactly the same thing” that alcohol distributors went through with the lifting of Prohibition, in the early 20th century, added Viditz-Ward, thanks to the newly revised Colorado Department of Revenue laws, passed last month, fine-tuning business operations in Colorado, with upwards of 800 pot shops, and the first state to license for-profit pot peddling.

New locks were installed as well – although the requisite Grade 2 locks were in place, Viditz-Ward said, when they moved in, documentation to that effect was unavailable.

“We are absolutely over-regulated,” Viditz-Ward said, with a level of surveillance “you would never see in a liquor store,” let alone a doctor's office.

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