Being There: The Photography of Kane Scheidegger
by Peter Shelton
Feb 07, 2013 | 1961 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
BOX FACTORY ASPENS – One of the large-scale panoramic photographs by Kane Scheidegger on display this Saturday (Feb. 9) at Ridgway’s Independence Building (555 Clinton Street). (Photo by Kane Scheidegger)
BOX FACTORY ASPENS – One of the large-scale panoramic photographs by Kane Scheidegger on display this Saturday (Feb. 9) at Ridgway’s Independence Building (555 Clinton Street). (Photo by Kane Scheidegger)
slideshow
WALK THIS WAY – A recent panoramic photograph from Thailand by Kane Scheidegger on display this Saturday (Feb. 9) at the Independence Building in Ridgway. (Photo by Kane Scheidegger)
WALK THIS WAY – A recent panoramic photograph from Thailand by Kane Scheidegger on display this Saturday (Feb. 9) at the Independence Building in Ridgway. (Photo by Kane Scheidegger)
slideshow

RIDGWAY – The astonishing – and astonishingly large and sharp – panoramic photographs that will be on display this Saturday (Feb. 9) beginning at 6 p.m. in Ridgway’s Independence Building were not created using a panoramic (super wide angle) camera.

No, photographer Kane Scheidegger “builds” the images from multiple exposures with a traditional, 35mm digital camera. “Everything is shot on a tripod,” said Scheidegger, a Ridgway native with an office/studio on North Cora Street. “I shoot each image in vertical format, then pan the camera. Everything else [the fusing together in a seamless whole] is post-production on the computer.”

He calls them “visions.”

Of course, none of the technical stuff would matter if Scheidegger didn’t also have a fabulous eye. He’s been doing this, building panoramas that subtly reproduce the sensation of “being there” for the last three years. His images don’t distort or “wrap around” the viewer so much as incorporate one’s natural peripheral vision.

On the wall, at roughly seven feet wide by three feet high, the impression is of being there.

And being there at spectacular, rarely-seen moments. Scheidegger will show two different views of the north side of the Sneffels Range, from a perspective high above the “Willow Swamp” on East Dallas Creek. One image features the balmy reds of turning oak leaves; the other sweeps in after an autumn snowstorm: bright yellow aspens re-emerge from beneath a dominating blanket of white.

Also featured will be a contemplative shot of aspens behind an old wood-and-wire fence in Box Factory Park. “It’s a black-and-white, right after an early snowfall. The leaves were at their peak – so bright they show as pure white” in the photograph, Scheidegger said.

Besides his native San Juan Mountains, Scheidegger will display images from a recent trip to Thailand. The coastal scenes are filled with intriguing detail: tiny people and fishing boats and wooden walkways extending palm-lined beaches. Some are black-and-white; some are dominated by unearthly shades of ocean blue. None more striking than the Zuni-turquoise blue Scheidegger found in Columbine Lake on a stormy summer afternoon, one of his most dramatic regional scenes.

Scheidegger promises “Valentine’s Day discounts offered on all show pieces.”

His work can be seen year round at A+Y Gallery in Montrose and on the walls of the Telluride Medical Center.

For more information, visit KaneDezign.com.

Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet